Are you the publisher? Claim or contact us about this channel


Embed this content in your HTML

Search

Report adult content:

click to rate:

Account: (login)

More Channels


Channel Catalog


Channel Description:

Latest education news, comment and analysis on schools, colleges, universities, further and higher education and teaching from the Guardian, the world's leading liberal voice

older | 1 | .... | 1483 | 1484 | (Page 1485) | 1486 | 1487 | .... | 1491 | newer

    0 0

    Business students learn about accounting techniques, but not enough about ethics. This is why corporate scandals persist

    As a university teacher of accounting, I see the world through a particular lens. When I read about the sales scandal at Wells Fargo, I can’t help but think about the people who naively designed the incentive schemes that triggered this type of unethical behaviour. When I hear about the complex transfer pricing schemes at companies such as Amazon and Starbucks that enable them to avoid tax, I start wondering which accounting techniques they used. In short, I see the strong connection between unethical business practices and accounting techniques.

    Related: Why is the curriculum so white in business schools? | Alessia Contu

    Continue reading...

    0 0

    From skiing holidays in New England to netball tours to Sri Lanka, more and more schools are offering their pupils adventures of a lifetime. But at what cost to the kids who can’t afford to go – and the social division that creates?

    This school trip to BORNEO (I shit thee nay) costs THREE THOUSAND FIVE HUNDRED ENGLISH POUNDS,” began an animated conversation on Twitter this week. The author of the tweet was a mother whose 15-year-old son had been invited by his school to travel to south-east Asia. Was he at Eton, one puzzled respondent asked. No, she replied, it was her son’s “bog standard secondary”.

    Expensive school trips to far-flung corners of the globe are fast becoming the norm, not just in elite, private schools, but in ordinary state secondary schools up and down the country. Other contributors to the Twitter conversation told of trips to Japan, Madagascar and Cambodia, all costing in the region of £3,000. There was a netball trip to Sri Lanka, and an opportunity for some lucky children to travel to Uganda to see gorillas and help build a school, for a minimum price tag of £2,800. Other school destinations now include New Zealand, China and the Caribbean; there are trips to the Galápagos, the Arctic and Namibia. Really, it seems there is nowhere on the planet that is out of the question.

    Continue reading...

    0 0

    Fossil fuel companies have infiltrated universities for years. Are students and academics increasingly turning against them?

    At a recent green innovation event at Imperial College, London, PhD candidate Naomi Pratt and several other students handed out flyers. They were holding elephants on sticks, or “oilophants”, to represent the elephant in the room at the discussion: Imperial’s links with the fossil fuel industry. “Within two minutes we had security guards coming round saying ‘you can’t hand out flyers here, you can’t have this sign. Move along, you’ve made your point,’” Pratt says.

    Pratt is the leader of Divest Imperial, a group set up to pressure the university to eliminate financial investments in fossil fuel companies from its endowment fund, and reduce its reliance on research funding from the fossil fuel industry. Although their protests are not always shut down, the recent event wasn’t her only experience of being asked to stop flyering in a public part of campus. “It’s a stark example of how Imperial is run as a business, and how it’s trying to control its image,” she says.

    Continue reading...

    0 0

    Lecturers in UK will refuse to teach at Dubai outpost after Matthew Hedges sentencing

    Staff at the University of Birmingham have voted for an academic boycott of its campus in the United Arab Emirates as fears grow for the rights and safety of academics and students following the life sentence given to a Durham PhD student accused of spying in the UAE.

    The motion passed on Thursday means lecturers based in Birmingham will refuse to teach in Dubai and will not provide the campus with any academic support, such as course materials and marking exams.

    Continue reading...

    0 0

    Increasingly expensive jaunts are divisive, put pressure on families and risk causing more harm than good

    Schools are not just a microcosm of society; they mediate it too. The best seek to ameliorate the external pressures on their pupils while equipping them better to understand and handle the world outside – at once sheltering them and broadening their horizons. This is ambitious in any circumstances, and in a divided and unequal society the two ideals can clash outright.

    Trips that many adults would consider the adventure of a lifetime – treks in Borneo, a sports tour to Barbados – appear to have become almost routine at some state schools. Parents are being asked for thousands of pounds. Though schools cannot profit from these trips, the companies that arrange them do. Meanwhile, pupils arrive at school hungry because their families can’t afford breakfast. The Child Poverty Action Group says nine in every classroom of 30 fall below the poverty line. The disparity is obscene. Introducing a fundraising requirement for students does not help; better-off children tap up richer aunts and neighbours.

    Continue reading...

    0 0

    Learning Together system of restorative practice trialled in English schools

    Schools can significantly reduce the impact of bullying and improve pupils’ wellbeing by using a specialised system of conflict resolution and training, according to a ground-breaking study published in the Lancet.

    The research, led by the London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine and University College London, was conducted over three years in state schools in the south of England, and is the first of its type to study the use of “restorative practice” within schools, bringing together victims and perpetrators of damaging behaviour.

    Continue reading...

    0 0

    Sutton Trust says some work three or more schemes for free with little reward

    Graduates are being trapped in a cycle of unpaid internships that offer no significant benefit to their career, research by a social mobility charity has found.

    The Sutton Trust reports that around one in four graduates (27%) have done an unpaid internship in order to “get a foot in the door” in pursuit of their career goals.

    Continue reading...

    0 0

    Minority ethnic staff are stuck on the lowest rungs of the career ladder. They need more opportunities to rise up

    Would you be surprised to read that women may earn more on average than men in higher education? If you’ve followed gender pay gap reporting over recent years, it’s an improbable statement. Yet one of the findings of our research on pay differences in universities is that white women earn more than black men.

    This is not a statistical magic trick, but the results of an intersectional analysis of pay, which looks at gender and ethnicity together rather than in isolation. With ethnicity pay gap reporting on the horizon, organisations could be required to shine a light on differences in the pay of minority ethnic and white staff in a similar fashion to gender pay gap reporting. The numbers will not be pretty, but at least they will encourage ongoing work to improve the situation.

    Continue reading...

    0 0

    My university is making cuts to improve its rankings performance, but the pressure on staff is making things worse

    In the past few years, universities across the UK have launched so-called “voluntary” severance programmes aimed at shedding hundreds of staff. The programme at my institution, though, explicitly threatens compulsory redundancies if too few staff “volunteer”. The alleged objective of the exercise is to create cost savings that can be redeployed in unnamed ways and improve individual institutional rankings in national league tables. This feels unfair when those rankings have no official status as a reliable measure of institutional and departmental success or failure.

    This policy has damaged staff morale. The threat hangs over all my colleagues’ discussions, departmental or otherwise. Our line managers reassure us that we will not suffer a direct hit, but the promises feel meaningless because the decision-making process is happening higher up. The intention of these tactics is clear: avert a panic or strike among staff until whenever the compulsory redundancies begin.

    Continue reading...

    0 0

    As students, we must urge our universities to end their collaboration in climate breakdown

    Two weeks ago, an investigation revealed that Oxbridge colleges are bankrolling fossil fuel extraction on a vast scale. This is only one part of a rot running through much of the UK higher education sector, which students and staff have been fighting for years. Despite many victories for campaigners, educational institutions remain deeply invested in corporations that pose an existential risk to marginalised communities across the world.

    Cambridge University invests an estimated £377m in fossil fuels. Management here have ignored years of campaigning: a motion to divest fully from fossil fuels was passed by the staff governing body and hundreds of academics have called on Cambridge to divest, as have Labour party leadership and the former Archbishop of Canterbury. Still, those controlling the money pay no attention.

    Continue reading...

    0 0

    The poet appointed by lord mayor Magid Magid to champion creative arts wants to change the face of poetry

    People too often think of poetry as posh and white: “the picture of snobbery,” says Otis Mensah. But at just 23-years-old, the self-described working class radical hip-hop artist and storyteller was last month given the title of Sheffield’s first poet in residence. As the first hip hop artist to be awarded a poet laureate title in the UK, he wants to use the position to “break down barriers”, smash the stuffy stereotype, and remind people that poetry is meant to be “for the people”.

    Related: Magid Magid, Sheffield’s lord mayor: ‘I’ve had a lot of stick, but I don’t care’

    Continue reading...

    0 0

    Academics ask New York University to use its Abu Dhabi campus to press the UAE government for the release of Matthew Hedges

    Around 200 academics from New York University have called on their institution to publicly condemn the life imprisonment of the Durham PhD student accused of spying by the United Arab Emirates.

    In a letter addressed to NYU president, Andrew Hamilton, the academics said the university, which has a campus in Abu Dhabi, should use its ties with the UAE government to press for the release of Matthew Hedges, whose detention they describe as unjustified and “tantamount to torture”.

    Continue reading...

    0 0

    Cambridge and Oxford have high likelihood of support if problems arise, says Moody’s

    The government would almost certainly bail out major British universities in financial danger, although less prestigious institutions may not be so lucky, according to a leading credit ratings agency.

    Moody’s, the international ratings agency, told its clients in a research note that its ratings of universities included a high probability that the government would intervene to prop up an institution in difficulty because of the potential disruption.

    Continue reading...

    0 0

    State-educated applicants to graduate schemes at top firms come from elite pool – report

    Applications to graduate-entry positions at leading law, finance and management firms reveal an “unrecognised apartheid” among England’s state schools, according to research that found more than 1,000 state secondary schools had no former pupils applying to elite programmes.

    The research, looking at state-educated applicants to join companies such as Linklaters or Deloitte, found one in 10 came from a small group of mostly selective schools around London. Out of all the former state school pupils who applied, more than half were drawn from just 10% of England’s secondary schools.

    Continue reading...

    0 0

    If the spiritual importance of the artefact matters to its owners, why deny them? This is a political issue, not an aesthetic one

    Be prepared. The great museums of Europe are about to see an invasion of former colonies demanding the return of their stuff. This week the governor of Easter Island, Tarita Alarcón Rapu, tearfully pleaded with the British Museum to have back her ancestor, immortally embodied in a statue in its possession. “You have our soul,” she said. Her audience must have cringed.

    For Rapu’s people the statue, one of many, carries with it the spirit of her island. For Britain it is just a statue, stolen by a British frigate as a bauble for Queen Victoria in 1868. But then Britons can be equally dotty about the Stone of Scone and the crown jewels.

    Continue reading...

    0 0

    The British space pioneer on what it takes to pass the toughest job interview

    The astronaut selection process at the European Space Agency is unforgiving from the start. On day one, candidates assemble in Hamburg for six rounds of tests that run back to back, with 10-minute breaks in between. All are designed to expose weaknesses in people’s “hard skills”: their mental arithmetic, visual perception, working memory, pattern recognition, concentration, and more. Most are abilities that cannot be taught.

    “On the first day of testing you are so exposed. There is no hiding place,” says Tim Peake, an army major and former helicopter test-pilot who became Britain’s first ESA astronaut in 2009. “They are analysing your brain and you’ve either got it or you haven’t. I was more nervous about that stage than anything else.”

    Continue reading...

    0 0

    Husband of Nazanin Zaghari-Ratcliffe offers support to Daniela Tejada, who is also fighting for her spouse’s release

    It is a club to which neither wants to belong. But Richard Ratcliffe and Daniela Tejada have built an alliance in adversity based on their shared trauma: the detention of their British spouses abroad.

    Last week, as Matthew Hedges, Tejada’s husband, was sentenced to life in a United Arab Emirates prison, Ratcliffe, the husband of Nazanin Zaghari-Ratcliffe, immediately got in touch with her to express his solidarity and support.

    Continue reading...

    0 0

    Schools introduce walk-to-school initiatives and stock up on asthma medicine

    Schools across the UK are taking ever more drastic steps in an effort to mitigate the effects of air pollution on their pupils’ health.

    Amid growing concern about the long-term implications of toxic air on young people’s development, the Guardian has found one London school is raising money for face masks for its pupils, while a growing number are installing air purifiers in classrooms and thousands more are trying to deter parents from using their cars on the school run.

    Continue reading...

    0 0

    Micheal Olorode, 21, on how he has funded his way through university without a loan

    Name Micheal Olorode
    Age 21
    Income£12,000
    Occupation Studying to become NHS physiotherapist

    I’m a student in my fourth year of a biomedical science degree at Robert Gordon University in Aberdeen, but I also work 38 hours a week at Sainsbury’s to make ends meet. I do three night shifts a week, plus overtime if I can get it. Monday is the most hectic day for me – I work from 10pm until 8am on Saturday and Sunday nights, earning just over £100 a night, and then I have to be at my first lecture at 9am on Monday. By the time I finish lectures, at 2pm, I’m very tired, but I know I have to be back at work by 10pm.

    Continue reading...

    0 0

    Durham University and University of Exeter join backlash against Gulf state over academic’s imprisonment

    The academic backlash against the life imprisonment of Matthew Hedges is growing, with two more UK universities cutting ties with the United Arab Emirates until the Durham PhD candidate accused of spying is released.

    Durham University has suspended all field research in the UAE, while lecturers at the University of Exeter, where Hedges did his master’s degree, have voted in favour of an academic boycott and called on the vice-chancellor to suspend all business partnerships with the Gulf state.

    Continue reading...

older | 1 | .... | 1483 | 1484 | (Page 1485) | 1486 | 1487 | .... | 1491 | newer