Are you the publisher? Claim or contact us about this channel


Embed this content in your HTML

Search

Report adult content:

click to rate:

Account: (login)

More Channels


Channel Catalog


Channel Description:

Latest education news, comment and analysis on schools, colleges, universities, further and higher education and teaching from the Guardian, the world's leading liberal voice

older | 1 | .... | 1486 | 1487 | (Page 1488) | 1489 | 1490 | 1491 | newer

    0 0

    Letters from Pete Dorey, Christine Hawkes, Bernie Evans, Prof Colin Richards and Dr Nick Pratt

    Paul Hewitson (Letters, 28 November) quotes Jack Britton, the author of an Institute for Fiscal Studies report into graduate pay, who referred to “a large class of men doing courses that have a zero or negative monetary value”. How do we measure the value of a degree? Is it solely and wholly on the basis of graduate earnings? Presumably, then, a degree that leads to a career in teaching or nursing is worth only a fraction of a degree that leads into commercial law or corporate accountancy? What about the value to society? What about the educational and intellectual value of a degree? What about less tangible factors such as cultural enrichment, interacting with people from other backgrounds, communication skills, fostering improved literacy?

    Judging the value of academic qualifications purely on the basis of subsequent earnings is all too typical of the crass philistinism that the current government and the rightwing press routinely promote, and which views universities as little more than educational supermarkets selling a packaged product to bargain-hunting student consumers; universities in which education and learning are increasingly subordinated to providing the skills and training apparently demanded by big business.
    Pete Dorey
    Bath, Somerset

    Continue reading...

    0 0

    Racist violence and abuse are obvious products of prejudice - but there are subtler examples too

    Continue reading...

    0 0

    The government uses fearmongering to draw votes, and then pretends there is no link when a child refugee is bullied

    The hardest thing to come to terms with, watching the video of a Syrian boy being bullied in a Huddersfield school that circulated last week, was the sense of inevitability to it. The degradation of the country’s political culture continues to play out: it has been poisoned by Brexit, jaundiced by Islamophobia, while anti-immigrant sentiment has been normalised by the Conservative government. We’ve been heading here for years, decades even – to a place where a refugee can flee a civil war to Britain’s safe shores, only to face another type of barbarism, and become a refugee again.

    Related: Syrian Huddersfield boy asks people not to attack his alleged bully

    Continue reading...

    0 0

    A picture book dedicated to English’s strangest quirks has made the New York Times bestseller list, with the publisher scrambling to reprint. How did the rapper behind it dream it up?

    The self-declared “worst alphabet book ever” has become a surprise hit over the last fortnight, with hundreds of thousands of parents rushing to get their hands on P is for Pterodactyl: a picture book that explains to children that while A might be for apple, it’s also for aisle.

    Dreamed up by Raj Haldar, also known as the rapper Lushlife, with computer programmer Chris Carpenter, P is for Pterodactyl was published by US independent Sourcebooks on 13 November. The first print run of 10,000 copies sold out almost immediately, with the publisher now reporting more than 100,000 unfulfilled orders as they wait for a reprint of another 210,000 copies . Demand has also spiked in the UK; sales representative Rob Richardson said that social media buzz after a Facebook post from Imagination Soup saw sales spike from five to 3,000 orders overnight, with an additional and “pretty unprecedented” 10,000 advance orders the next day.

    Continue reading...

    0 0

    The skins they live in

    UPDATE: The solution is now available here.

    Hi guzzlers,

    Today I have a logic puzzle based on the complex kinship rules found in Australian Aboriginal society. Aboriginal groups are divided into subgroups, called “skins.” Your skin is determined at birth, based on your parents’ skins, and it does not change in your lifetime. Your skin will determine certain social rules, such as who you marry.

    Continue reading...

    0 0

    Central European University is first major university to be pushed out of an EU country

    Central European University has announced it will leave Budapest for Vienna next year after a protracted legal and rhetorical battle with the Hungarian government, in what is the first case of a major university being pushed out of an EU country.

    The university, which teaches in English and is regarded as one of the best in the region, has been in the crosshairs of the government of Hungary’s far-right prime minister, Viktor Orbán, for the past two years, in part because of its affiliation with George Soros, who founded it and is still on the board.

    Continue reading...

    0 0

    Headteachers and campaigners fighting cuts to special needs education call move ‘sickening’

    Headteachers and campaigners for children with special educational needs and disabilities (SEND) have reacted with fury to a government announcement that 16 grammar schools are to split a £50m bonus to create new school places.

    Related: Councils face £536m shortfall in Send budgets, says LGA

    Continue reading...

    0 0

    Strike comes as negotiations for higher wages, more resources and smaller class sizes have hit an impasse

    Chicago teachers are planning to walk out on Tuesday in what’s believed to be the country’s first major charter school teacher strike.

    Teachers and their union argue the independent schools are overcrowded and underfunded and have been used to create a “second tier in the teaching profession”. The strike comes as negotiations for higher wages, more resources and smaller class sizes have hit an impasse.

    Continue reading...

    0 0

    The solution to today’s puzzle

    Earlier today I set you the following puzzle: Aboriginal groups are divided into subgroups, called “skins.” Your skin is determined at birth, based on your parents’ skins, and it does not change in your lifetime. Your skin will determine certain social rules, such as who you are allowed to marry.

    The Warlpiri, who live northwest of Alice Springs, divide themselves into eight skins, according to the rules in the diagram below. Yes, it’s complicated! The skins are numbered 1 to 8. The horizontal rows indicate marriage correspondences, while the arrows point from mother to child. (All the marriages here are between men and women, and we can assume no divorces or half-siblings or step children.).

    Continue reading...

    0 0

    Cost-cutting proposals to cut liberation officers to plug £3m deficit meets with outrage

    The National Union of Students has come under fire after it emerged that proposals are being considered to get rid of liberation officers, who represent black, LGBT+, trans, disabled and women students, in order to cut costs.

    The proposal is just one of a number of measures under consideration to try to plug the projected £3m deficit facing the troubled union, which represents the bulk of students in UK higher and further education.

    Continue reading...

    0 0

    A prime minister with a real plan for Brexit would have poured resources into training, answering the cry of the left behind

    Could any good come from Brexit? Remainers in despair search in vain in these dark days for any shred of hope. What possible gain can come from this morass of fantasy and rightwing myth-making? But if controlling our borders swung most Brexit voters, could there be one upside to that instinctive xenophobic reflex?

    Theresa May has always been adamantine in her insistence on cutting net immigration to less than 100,000, defying business and the cabinet. She has been willing to lose essential skilled workers and turn away valuable students to keep Britain hostile to allcomers.

    Continue reading...

    0 0

    If Brexit makes the UK less welcoming to those from abroad, UK higher education will be looking into the abyss

    I managed to go about 30 minutes without thinking about Brexit. Might be a new record for me. But if I can stop shaking my head long enough, I want to ruminate on what this expression of the will of the people means for universities.

    First off, politicians claiming to know what “the people” voted for, whether leaving the single market, wanting a level playing ground for non-EU immigrants, or something about fish, are deluding themselves. I once witnessed a student society unanimously vote to fire an employee, even though no one really wanted him gone. They intended to send him a message to watch his step, by engineering a vote in which he would squeak through with a tiny majority. They badly miscalculated. Brexit morning brought this memory flooding back.

    Continue reading...

    0 0

    A coding robot for early IT skills; a doll for making friends – and don’t forget a chess set. What teachers would put under the tree

    Anastasia Boreham, deputy head of Maryland primary school in east London, recommends a light prism (£8.99) for children under three: “This enables children to study colour and light by making light patterns on the wall. Even babies and infants will enjoy this.”

    Continue reading...

    0 0

    Thousands missing out on vital support, report says, with pupils being removed illegally

    The schools watchdog Ofsted has delivered a damning indictment of the education of children with special educational needs and disabilities, warning that provision is “disjointed and inconsistent”, with thousands missing out on vital support to which they are entitled.

    In her second annual report as chief inspector of England’s schools, Amanda Spielman drew attention to the plight of pupils with SEND, warning that diagnoses were taking too long, were often inaccurate, and mental health needs were not supported sufficiently.

    Continue reading...

    0 0

    Three Harris academy staff forced to leave after suspected tampering with Sats tests

    The headteacher and two other staff members have left a London primary school after an internal investigation found that Sats papers had been systematically altered and missing answers added.

    A letter to parents with children at the Harris Primary Academy Philip Lane in Tottenham, north London, said the headteacher, Emma Penzer, the deputy head and another teacher would not be returning to the school, after the year 6 national test results were cancelled.

    Continue reading...

    0 0

    Brighton and Hove’s first ever reuse manager, Cat Fletcher, says there’s nothing hippyish about repurposing second-hand scrap

    Many people think waste is smelly, rotten and useless. But Cat Fletcher, the self-styled “resource goddess”, doesn’t see it that way. In fact, she’s keen to get her hands on it. “To me there’s no such thing as waste – there’s just stuff in the wrong place,” she says. Fletcher, who runs several reuse programmes in Brighton and whose own home has “absolutely nothing new in it”, says we all need to reuse old things. And she says every business and council should employ someone like her to help them do it.

    Fletcher, 55, founded Freegle UK, where thousands of people give their old things away online. “It’s a lovely social activity,” she says. For example, if you’re giving away a tennis racquet you might meet someone else who plays tennis. She also built the award-winning Waste House, along with architect Duncan Baker-Brown, on the University of Brighton’s campus in 2014. The house is filled with repurposed rubbish, such as old duvets, cut-off jeans and CDs. And it looks surprisingly stylish, too.

    Continue reading...

    0 0

    Demonising parents for not getting kids out of nappies is part of a wider class agenda at the heart of the austerity programme

    Potty training is a parent’s job, according to Amanda Spielman, the head of Ofsted, interviewed earlier this week. It’s such an uncontroversial statement – who could think otherwise? Even on a practical level, if you left it to a teacher, you’d run the risk of a child who was only potty-trained during school hours. Yet the statement fails a basic authenticity test: it does not mean what it appears to mean.

    Related: Potty training gets messy. But I wouldn’t pay anyone else to do it | Fran Taylor

    Continue reading...

    0 0

    Ofsted chief says schools must get back to basics and not rely on an ‘elixir’ to raise standards

    The chief inspector of schools in England has warned teachers and policymakers against resting their hopes on the latest educational gimmicks and urged them instead to focus on getting the basics right.

    Launching her second annual report as head of Ofsted, Amanda Spielman advised against the likes of Brain Gym, a controversial programme of exercises favoured by some schools that claims to improve children’s cognitive ability.

    Continue reading...

    0 0

    EHRC move follows a string of high-profile racial incidents on UK campuses

    Britain’s equality watchdog has launched an inquiry into racial harassment at universities amid mounting evidence of students and staff from minority groups facing abuse.

    The Equality and Human Rights Commission (EHRC) said on Tuesday it was aware of claims from some student groups that universities were “brushing incidents under the carpet unless they go viral on social media”.

    Continue reading...

    0 0

    Waltham Holy Cross primary school is under threat of forced academisation. But local people are fighting back

    This is a story about democracy in Britain, how badly it is broken and how it might be fixed. It is about people battling arrogant bureaucrats and highly paid company executives. Yet it is a world away from television debates, trade negotiations or legal small print. It concerns instead something far more fundamental: the schools our children attend. And it begins 30 miles from Westminster, in an Essex market town on Monday night this week.

    While outside is drizzle and dark, inside Waltham Abbey town hall are almost 200 people worried about the future of a primary school. This meeting has been pulled together on a shoestring by parents living in a part of Essex where politics is usually about working out which candidate is wearing the blue rosette. Only tonight this hall looks like the setting for a suburban mutiny.

    Continue reading...

older | 1 | .... | 1486 | 1487 | (Page 1488) | 1489 | 1490 | 1491 | newer